St. Patrick’s Day Facts

Sunday is St. Patrick’s Day. As is our tradition, our family spends time with some friends and neighbors. We’ll all dress in green and enjoy some traditional foods, such as corned beef and cabbage, and Irish soda bread. What about you? Do you celebrate St. Patrick’s Day? If so, let us know!

Anyway, there are loads of interesting information about St. Patrick’s Day. Here are a few, from mentalfloss.com:

  • Blue, not green: St. Patrick’s color was “Saint Patrick’s blue,” a light shade. The color green only became associated with the day after it was linked to the Irish independence movement in the late 18th century.
  • Patrick was British: Although he made his mark by introducing Christianity to Ireland in the year 432, Patrick wasn’t Irish himself. He was born to Roman parents in Scotland or Wales in the late fourth century.
  • It might have been St. Maewyn’s Day: According to Irish legend, St. Patrick wasn’t originally called Patrick. His birth name was Maewyn Succat, but he changed his name to Patricius after becoming a priest.
  • About those shamrocks: According to Irish legend, the saint used the three-leafed plant as a metaphor for the Holy Trinity when he was first introducing Christianity to Ireland.
  • About that phrase: So what does “Erin go Bragh” mean? It’s a corruption of the Irish Éirinn go Brách, which roughly means “Ireland Forever.”

Since we’re talking history here, let’s acknowledge today, March 15, which is the Ides of March. (You might have heard the expression, “beware the Ides of March.”) This marks the day in 44 B.C. that conspirators led by Marcus Junius Brutus stabbed Julius Caesar to death before the Roman senate. This was a significant turning point in Roman history.

Well, let’s end this history lesson by wishing you all a happy and safe St. Patrick’s Day!

Best Regards,
Taylor

The Pros And Cons Of Daylight Saving Time

Whether you like it or not, on Sunday at 2 a.m. we’ll be turning the clocks ahead an hour. After speaking about it with people in our office, I realized how divisive this event can be!

While some like the extra daylight when they leave the office, others complain about how tired they are for several weeks until their bodies adjust.

What do you think of Daylight Saving Time – good thing or not so good thing?

Let’s take a look at some of the not so good things about DST, according to msn.com:

  • Daylight savings can cause sleep deprivation: By springing ahead, we can alter our circadian rhythm and this can throw us off for several weeks.
  • DST can put people at greater risk for cardiovascular conditions: A 2014 study found that on the Monday after DST begins, 24% more people have heart attacks than on other Mondays throughout the year. On the flipside, the study noted a 21% decrease in heart attacks the Tuesday after DST ends.
  • It can lead to an increase in workplace injuries: The 2013 Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses reported a rise in injuries in the summer months – and a decrease in November and December, after a return to standard time.
  • And more car accidents: Austin C. Smith, an assistant professor of economics at Miami University, reports a 6.3% increase in fatal car accidents for six days following the spring time change.
  • You might be less productive at the office because of DST: DST might also be to blame for “cyberloafing” – the act of wasting time online at work. A series of studies conducted at Pennsylvania State University in 2012 found that on the Monday after the time change employees are more likely to browse websites unrelated to their job.

On the other hand, there are good things about Daylight Saving Time. Here are some interesting tidbits from popularmechanics.com:

  • In the Western world, we typically spend more awake time in the evenings than in the mornings. We also enjoy many benefits from being awake in the sunshine. This leads to an increase in vitamin D, increased exercise, increased socializing, and overall improvements to mental health that come with sunlight.
  • A paper from the Brookings Institute finds that there’s a 7% decrease in crime following the shift to DST. In 2007, when DST was extended through November 1, that drop resulted in an estimated $59 million in savings from robberies not committed. The reason is simple: crimes tend to happen much more often in darkness. Extend the daylight, and crimes, especially outdoor crimes like muggings, go down.
  • Opponents of DST note that, in the week following the spring clock change, traffic accidents spike. But, DST lasts eight months, not a week, and the net effect of DST on traffic accidents is overwhelmingly positive. In fact, studies actually estimate that we could save about 366 more lives per year if we extended DST all year round. It is, very simply, easier to drive in daylight.

So remember to move any clocks – at least those that are not connected to the Internet in some way – ahead one hour.

Have a great weekend, and I hope you’re not too groggy on Monday!

Best Regards,

Taylor

The Wonderful World Of Coupons

Like almost everybody else, I LOVE coupons! And I’m sure most of you do, too. In fact, according to CreditCards.com, 85% of Americans use coupons.

Do you use coupons? If so, where do you get your coupons? Oh, and another thing: A few times I’ve forgotten to bring my (paper) coupons with me to the store. Anyone have any suggestions for remembering to bring and use their coupons? Let us know by leaving a comment!

Anyway, a website called accessdevelopment.com pulled together a massive amount of information about coupons. Here are just a few of the very interesting stats cited:

  • 97% of consumers look for deals when they shop and 92% said they are always looking
  • 81% of consumers search for dining deals on a regular basis
  • 85% of consumers look for coupons prior to visiting a retailer
  • 74% of consumers review circulars and print ads before making a purchase
  • $3.1 billion was saved by consumers in 2017 thanks to coupons
  • 42% of consumers save over $30/week using coupons; 30% save over $50/week
  • Over half of consumers use a coupon in at least one of every four purchases
  • 87% of Millennials, 91% of Generation Xers and 96% of Baby Boomers used coupons in 2016
  • 53% of consumers indicated they invest over two hours a week looking for deals and savings across all sources
  • 55% of consumers said they use both digital and paper coupons
  • 52% of consumers print out digital coupons for use in stores

Finally, here are some useful scanning tips regarding coupons and deals:

  • If you purchase items using a special deal like a coupon, discount, or store sale, please let us know. Manufacturers and retailers really want to know what types of deals you’re using when you buy their products.
  • Many coupons have barcodes on them. Of course we want you to tell us about any coupons you use, but please do not scan the barcode on the coupon. Although the scanner or NCPMobile App may accept the barcode, the information is not readable to us.

Well, I have to get back to clipping my coupons! Have a great weekend, and happy shopping!

Best Regards,

Taylor

Do You Know Your Stores?

Every year NCP updates its Store List in the scanner and in the NCPMobile App. I love to review the store list and get to know the different stores.

I’ve gone to several NCP focus groups across the country and heard panel members talk about their local stores. This has helped me learn more about stores in other states that I wouldn’t be aware of otherwise. Now, when I travel, I recognize a lot of the store names!

Check out our Store Name List and Store Type Descriptions: www.ncponline.com/wbcnt/Members/StoreTypeDescriptions.pdf. This is a helpful reference list, so be sure to take some time to familiarize yourself with all the different store names and store types on it. (NOTE: Stores specific to your area are NOT included on this list.)

As you know, it is very important that you not only record your food store purchases, but also your purchases from all the other types of stores.

So when you record a shopping trip, be very careful to choose the correct store name; if you can’t find the store name, please select the appropriate store type. If you still can’t find the right Store Type, use “All Other Stores.” Even though you won’t be telling us the specific store, we can still use these information, plus you’ll be credited with having provided us with a shopping trip.

Here are some Store Types (and descriptions) that you might not have thought of and that we want you to be aware of:

  • Bagel Store – Sells fresh-baked bagels and rolls right and refrigerated items, such as milk, eggs, juice, butter and cream cheese.
  • Beverage Store – Sells a large selection of soda, beer, water, etc. (Some items may be sold in large quantities.)
  • Bodega – Small grocery store that sells primarily ethnic/international items, such as tortillas and plantains, as well as beverages, snacks, prepared foods and household products.
  • Butcher – Sells a wide variety of meats. A clerk-attended counter is usually where you’ll place your order.
  • Close-Out Store – Sells a little bit of everything at highly discounted prices.
  • Coop/Farm/Feed – Sells bulk packages of food for livestock (i.e., cattle, horses, sheep) and other animals, such as dogs and cats. Primarily located in rural farm areas across the U.S. Veterinary supplies may be on hand, too. They also carry seeds that farmers use to plant their crops.
  • Craft Store – Sells mostly craft/hobby items, such as art supplies, yarn, ribbon, dried flowers, baskets, sewing patterns, etc.
  • Dairy Delivery – Use this if you have milk and other dairy products, such as cheese and ice cream, delivered to your door.
  • Fish Market/Store – Sells all types of fresh caught or frozen fish, as well as condiments to accompany your “catch.” This type of store can also be used for “open-air” markets where you can select your fish from outside stands.
  • Flea Market/Swap Meet – You’ll find all sorts of products in this type of “store.” It could be clothing, housewares, furnishings, beauty products, crafts and food, just to name a few. They may be permanent or temporary structures (indoor/outdoor) with many booths/stalls and may meet once or twice a week.
  • Free Sample/Gift – Use this when you receive a free sample or a free gift. Enter 0 (zero) for the price. Note: If you receive a free sample in a store, use the store name to record it.
  • Fruit Stand/Store – Sells all types of fruits and vegetables. They may also sell some other food products and perhaps even sell fruit trays, baskets and platters.
  • Garden Store – Sells all types of gardening supply items, including potted plants, fresh flowers, gardening tools, seeds, etc.
  • Home Delivery – Use this store type if there’s a store in your town where the only means of ordering a product is by phone and then it’s delivered to your home.
  • Hospital Pharmacy – Use this store type if you pick up medication from a pharmacy located in a hospital.
  • Kennel/Vet – Use this store type to record purchases made at a kennel or veterinarian’s office.
  • Mail Order – Use this when ordering an item by mailing an order form or calling a customer service phone number after making your selection from a catalog or flyer.
  • Manufacturer Outlet – Manufacturers of all types of products have outlets where they sell their products at discounted prices. Sometimes these are in “outlet malls.”
  • Military Store – Use this store type if you make purchases from a store located on a military base.
  • Pro Shop – Specializes in selling everything you need for one specific sport. Some Pro Shops are even located in sporting facilities, such as tennis courts, golf courses, bowling alleys and skating rinks.
  • Tobacco Store – Primarily sells cigarettes, cigars and other smoking accessories.
  • TV/Home Shopping – Use this store type specifically for merchandise (clothes, jewelry, etc.) that you purchased because you saw the item on television.
  • Vending Machine – Use this store type if you buy items from a vending machine, such as candy, soda, snacks, sandwiches, etc.

Have a great weekend!

Best Regards,
Taylor

Last Minute Valentine’s Day Plans

Today is Valentine’s Day! Now don’t panic if you’re still working out some plans and/or gift ideas. I have some tips for you! (Just so you know, this week’s blog is not directed at my husband, who’s always very good at making plans. Love you, hun! Happy Valentine’s Day!)

If you haven’t thought much about what to do today, here are a few ideas, from hitchedmag.com:

  • Create Something Together: Make a scrapbook or time capsule with your partner or children, parents, or friends, and fill it one with meaningful mementos. (The “time capsule” could be just an old coffee or box can that you place in the closet and open on a significant anniversary/day.) So all that sentimental stuff – photos, old movie tickets, take out menus, etc. – that Marie Kondo is encouraging you to toss out you can instead put in the time capsule or scrapbook. Talk about sparking joy!
  • Make A Romantic Meal at Home: Cook something that’s simple and serve the meal on a candlelit table. Play some soft, relaxing music in the background. And make sure to help your loved one clean up after the meal.
  • Go On A Picnic: If you live in a warm climate, take your valentine outside and enjoy some sandwiches and snacks. If you live in a colder part of the country, take your picnic inside; place a few blankets on the floor, and enjoy your meal right there.

Valentine’s Day doesn’t have to be dinner out at an exclusive restaurant or expensive jewelry or a big box of chocolate, although those things are pretty nice! Valentine’s Day just means spending time with a loved one (or loved ones).

We’re all crazy busy and so don’t always appreciate the people in our lives. So make this day special for the special people you know and love.

Oh, and don’t forget to record anything you buy your valentine, like flowers, candy, apparel, etc.

Have a very happy Valentine’s Day!

Best Regards,
Taylor

Millennials And Online Shopping

Are you a Millennial? If not, do you know a Millennial?

Well it seems that Millennials – anyone born between 1981 and 1996 (ages 23 to 38 in 2019) – really like to shop online.

Millennials are certainly more active on social media than older generations, and this impacts how they look for information as they shop. For example, Millennials are much more likely than the general population to “conduct online research for common items like food and cleaning products,” according to The Nielsen Company.

And Millennials aren’t just doing research, they’re also buying a lot of consumer packaged goods (basically, anything packaged with a barcode). Check out this chart – based on NCP data – regarding the percentage who purchased consumer packaged goods online in the past three months:

How do Millennials – and others – get online? Well, according to Nielsen data, Millennials are “highly mobile, and their smartphones are increasingly becoming their go-to devices when it’s time to shop.”

This is how the various demographic groups get online, according to Nielsen:


Since so many Millennials, and other groups, shop online, here are some tips for recording those very purchases!

  • Online purchases may come in one or multiple shipments and don’t always include a packing receipt. Consider printing out your email/order confirmation so you can refer back to it when reporting your purchase.
  • If your items do come separately, please scan them as you receive them.
  • If an item arrives with the UPC barcode covered by another label, try carefully peeling off that label and scanning the UPC barcode on the item (or manually enter the barcode number if the barcode is damaged).
  • If you buy something from the website of a retailer that also has a storefront, make sure to report the trip as an online purchase. For example, if you order something from Walmart’s website, select “walmart.com” when you record the purchase (whether the item was shipped directly to you or picked up at the store).

As always, thank you panel members for reporting all of your purchases, especially the online ones.

Have a great weekend!

Will The Groundhog Give Us A Break From This Bleak Weather?

Well, it’s almost Groundhog Day. And that means if the little critter sees his shadow there’s only six more weeks of winter. Or is it if he doesn’t see his shadow there’s six more weeks of winter?? I always get confused.

But anyway … With much of the country in a deep, deep, deep freeze, any thoughts of winter being over and done with works for me! It’s been ridiculously cold in many parts of the country.

So let’s hope for an early spring as we await the “official” word from our groundhog friend.

Did you know that Groundhog Day marks the halfway point to the spring equinox? Here are some other facts about the day and the little guy himself, from The Old Farmer’s Almanac (almanac.com):

  • According to legend, if a groundhog sees its shadow on this day, there will be six more weeks of winter; if it doesn’t, then spring is right around the corner. But, as the Almanac says, “If he sees his shadow, we’ll have six more weeks of winter; if he doesn’t, it’ll be six weeks till spring” because, of course, the dates of the equinox do not change.
  • Groundhog Day also represents “the triumph of spring over winter—and birth over death.” Originally, this was a Celtic festival marking the cross-quarter day, or midpoint of the season.
  • The Christian church later called this festival of light, “Candlemas.” The English name refers to the candles lit that day in churches to celebrate the presentation of the Christ Child in the temple of Jerusalem.
  • In the 1800s, German immigrants to Pennsylvania brought their Candlemas legends with them. Finding no badgers but lots of groundhogs, they adapted the New World species to fit the lore.
  • The groundhog, also known as a woodchuck or whistlepig, typically makes its home in the brambles and thickets that grow where forests meet fields. There, it digs burrows between 4 and 6 feet deep and up to 40 feet long—removing as much as 700 pounds of dirt in the process.

Now if you’re curious about the long-range weather forecast in your area of the country, check out this page on The Old Farmer’s Almanac’s website: www.almanac.com/weather/longrange

Stay warm my friends! And have a great weekend. And go Rams!

Best regards,

Taylor

Announcing The Winners Of The New Year’s Resolution Scavenger Hunt

Always a “crowd favorite,” our latest Scavenger Hunt contest has just ended. Did you find the images for the New Year’s Resolutions?

OK, if you don’t know what I’m talking about, the goal of this sweepstakes was to go through my 2018 blog postings and look for the six New Year’s Resolution-related images (graphics) that I had “planted” within specific blogs.

We had a lot of entries! Each of them were reviewed, and those that had all six correct answers were entered into the sweepstakes. We then randomly selected five winners.

Congratulations to these five individuals who will each receive a $50 Amazon Gift Card claim code. (The winners have already been alerted via email.)

  • Amy F. / puddin …
  • Chantel R. / rodrig …
  • Cheryl A. / cheryl …
  • Julia W. / 1870ju …
  • Lesley S. / stee …

Note: For privacy, we only used the first few letters of their email addresses.

Here are the blog postings where the six images were located:

Eat Healthy

Putting Gas In The Car? Record It! (Posted on July 27, 2018)

 

Exercise More

Have You Seen Any Good Movies Lately? (Posted on March 2, 2018)

 

Lose Weight

Dealing With Winter (Posted on January 12, 2018)

 

Save Money

Buying Books (Posted on November 30, 2018)

 

Travel More

A Lesson Learned Is A Lesson Shared (Posted on June 29, 2018)

 

Learn A New Skill

Are You Scanning Every Shopping Trip? (Posted on September 14, 2018)

 

Have a great weekend! For those of you who made resolutions, I hope you’re keeping them!

Best Regards,
Taylor

Commemorating MLK Day

Monday, January 21, is Martin Luther King Day. Our office, along with many other companies, banks, libraries, and the post office, will be closed.

So this is a good time to check out some facts about Martin Luther King, Jr., and the holiday that bears his name.

Facts about Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • King was the youngest person to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize when he won it at age 35. That record was broken in 2014 by a 17-year-old activist named Malala Yousafzai. 
  • At the Atlanta premier of the movie Gone with the Wind, Martin sang with his church choir.
  • He went to college at age 15 and became a minister at 19. He had his doctorate degree by age 25.
  • There are over 730 streets in the United States named after Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • The name on his original birth certificate is Michael King, which was a mistake. He was supposed to be named after his father who was named for Martin Luther, the leader of the Christian reformation movement.

Facts about Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, according to theodysseyonline.com:

  • MLK Day is only 1 of 3 national holidays in the U.S. honoring an individual person. George Washington, Christopher Columbus, and Martin Luther King, Jr. are the only individuals with national holidays honoring them. President’s Day, although commonly attributed with Lincoln’s birthday as well, was chosen because of Washington’s Birthday and was originally in honor of him alone.
  • MLK Day is celebrated on the third Monday of January because of King’s birthday. Martin Luther King, Jr. was born on January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. MLK Day is celebrated on the third Monday of each January because it is close to his birthday.
  • MLK Day is observed by groups in over 100 nations.

PSC Closed On Monday
As I mentioned at the beginning of this blog, our office and the Panel Support Center will be closed on Monday.

Remember To Take Part in Our New Year’s Resolution Scavenger Hunt Sweepstakes! 
Don’t forget, this scavenger hunt is still going on until Wednesday, January 23.

Similar to our other scavenger hunt sweepstakes, I’ve hidden images in past blog posts for you to find. All you need to do is go through all of my blog postings from 2018 and look for the six New Year’s Resolution-related images (graphics).

When you find any of the images listed (salad, scale, etc.), make a note of the blog post title where you found the image. After you have found all of the images, go to the link below andfollow the instructions. 

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/NCPBlog_ResolutionSweeps

I hope you have a nice weekend.

Take Part in Our New Year’s Resolution Scavenger Hunt Sweepstakes!

Did you make a New Year’s resolution? If so, have you kept it so far? (If you did make a resolution, tell us about it!)

Whether or not you made a resolution, make this resolution to play our New Year’s Resolution Scavenger Hunt Sweepstakes!

Similar to our other scavenger hunt sweepstakes, I’ve hidden images in past blog posts for you to find.

Your goal: Go through all of my blog postings from 2018 and look for the six New Year’s Resolution-related images (graphics) described below:

New Year’s Resolution                        Image To Find

·     Eat Healthy                       Salad

·     Exercise More                    Sneakers

·     Lose Weight                         Scale

·     Save Money                         Piggy Bank

·    Travel More                          Luggage

·    Learn A New Skill                Musical Instruments

When you find any of the images listed (salad, scale, etc.), make a note of the blog post title where you found the image. After you have found all of the images, go to the link below and follow the instructions. 

Go here to post your responses: 

surveymonkey.com/r/NCPBlog_ResolutionSweeps

Here are some other important details:

  • To be eligible, you must provide the exact title of the blog posting. (You may find it easier to copy and paste the exact title into the response field.) You do not need to include the date of the posting.
  • From all of the correct entries, five (5) winners will then be selected in a random drawing. Each winner will receive a $50 Amazon Gift Card claim code! (Please make sure to give us your contact information.)
  • The contest ends on Wednesday, January 23.

Please check out the rules.

Make sure you stick to this resolution! Good luck!

Amazon.com is not a sponsor of this promotion. Except as required by law, Amazon.com Gift Cards (“GCs”) cannot be transferred for value or redeemed for cash. GCs may be used only for purchases of eligible goods at Amazon.com or certain of its affiliated websites. For complete terms and conditions, see www.amazon.com/gc-legal. GCs are issued by ACI Gift Cards, Inc., a Washington corporation. All Amazon ®, ™ & © are IP of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates. No expiration date or service fees.